Give ’em Something to Tweet About . . . Twitter, Facebook Users Making Major Impact on Buying Decisions

Author: Alecia Pirulis  

If you thought social media-lites were merely playing around on social media sites, think again: Facebook Fans or followers of a brand on Twitter,

“are significantly more likely to buy or recommend (read: LEASE or REFER) the brand to a friend. Specifically, the study found consumers are 67% more likely to buy from the brands they follow on Twitter, and 51% more likely to buy from a brand they follow on Facebook. Moreover, they’re 79% more likely to recommend their Twitter follows to a friend.”

buy_recommend chart* Study by Chadwick Martin Bailey and iModerate Research Technologies

Wow . . . what a compelling set of stats! Information like this is absolutely game-changing, folks. As marketers, we have a new playing field on which to market to consumers: if we wish to capture these apparently high-converting leads, we need to work smarter and harder at engagement strategies to keep prospects coming back to our (your!) sites.

For the article, click here. For clever tips & ideas, see this excellent piece on resident engagement from Charity Hisle ‘s website, www.2witterbug.com.

Many companies talk about the cost of doing social media. Consider is this: what’s the cost of not participating? Perhaps equally as compelling is that the same study found,

“many consumers across a wide variety of demographics have negative perceptions of brands that aren’t using social media. Overall, the study is a sign that social media is becoming a competitive advantage for those that are participating, and an increasingly major weakness for those that aren’t.”

To read the article on Mashable.com, click here.

* Data was collected from 1,504 via a nationally representative online survey questionnaire within the United States by Chadwick Martin Bailey between February 8, 2010 and February 9, 2010. In addition iModerate Research Technologies conducted one-on-one discussions to more fully contextualize their social media behaviors.